THE 36TH CHICAGO LATINO FILM FESTIVAL GOES VIRTUAL!

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THE 36TH CHICAGO LATINO FILM FESTIVAL ANNOUNCES PROGRAMMING FOR ITS VIRTUAL EDITION, SEPT. 18-27

Pablo Larraín’s “Ema,” Gabriel Mascaro’s “Divine Love,” Juan José Campanella’s “The Weasel’s Tale,” the Central American anthology film “Days of Light,” and the world premiere of Chicago’s Colectivo El Pozo feature debut “Cuaco” among the highlights of this year’s virtual event.

CHICAGO (August 18, 2020) – The International Latino Cultural Center of Chicago announces today that the virtual edition of the 36th Chicago Latino Film Festival will present 43 features and 38 shorts, Sept. 18-27.

Some of the high profile titles participating in this year’s Festival include: Ema, Pablo Larraín’s exhilarating and incendiary drama about family and reggaetón starring Mariana Di Girolamo and Gael García Bernal (in his third collaboration with the Chilean director); Divine Love, Gabriel Mascaro’s (Neon Bull) dystopian tale about a woman’s pursuit of motherhood in a Brazil ruled by a fundamentalist party that has a say on its citizens’ sex and family lives; Amalia, the latest nightmare from Mars Volta founder Omar Rodríguez-López, about a woman who becomes obsessed with her late husband’s lover; the anthology film Days of Light, which brings together six filmmakers from each Central American country to tell six different stories about the aftermath of a solar storm in the entire region; four retired filmmakers match wits with a couple of ruthless real estate developers who will stop at nothing to buy their dilapidated mansion in The Weasel’s Tale, Juan José Campanella’s (The Secret in Their Eyes) darkly funny tribute to the golden age of Argentinean cinema; and Cuaco, the story of a man who returns home traveling through the same route he took to migrate to the United States three decades before, written and directed by the Pilsen-based Colectivo El Pozo.

The Festival was originally scheduled for April 16-30 at the AMC River East 21 Theatres, but was postponed on March 13th when Illinois Governor J.B. Pritzker and Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot ordered all events of a 1,000 or more attendees to be canceled or postponed due to the coronavirus pandemic.

“We are happy to finally be able to present this robust cinematic assortment of short and feature films. While we cannot gather in person to enjoy and engage our filmmakers and the public in a face-to-face conversation about these films this year, we are still providing this amazing talent and film lovers a platform to do so. We may not be able to travel to Latin American, Spain and Portugal right now due to the pandemic, but we are bringing these countries, their people and their stories to homes across the state through these shorts and features,” said Pepe Vargas, executive director of the International Latino Cultural Center of Chicago, producer of the Chicago Latino Film Festival.

The Festival will be working with Eventive, whose virtual screening platform has become, in the last few months, the leader in providing film festivals and independent films with a secure way to make these films available to a wider audience. All films will be geo-blocked to residents of the state of Illinois.

As with the live version of the Festival, each feature will be paired with a thematically appropriate short. Festival organizers will announce their schedule of pre-taped and live conversations and Q&As with select filmmakers close to the Festival date on their social media platforms and website. For updates, visit www.chicagolatinofilmfestival.org; or follow us on Facebook, @ChicagoLatinoFilmFestival or Instagram, @chilatinofilm.

TICKET INFORMATION
Tickets for films are $15 for general public and $13 for ILCC members, students and seniors; all fees are included in the price. After unlocking you’ll have 4 days to watch the film; once you begin, you will have 48 hours to finish watching. Festival passes good for 10 films: $100 for general public ($50 savings) and $80 for ILCC members, students and seniors ($70 savings).

Passes and individual tickets go on sale, September 2nd.

SPONSORS
The 36th Chicago Latino Film Festival is made possible by the generous contributions of sponsors and their continued commitment to the Latino arts and culture in Chicago:
Gold: Corona Extra

Silver: Allstate, Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences, Delta Air Lines – Aeromexico, DePaul University, The Whitehall Hotel, Yes! Press
Bronze: Coca-Cola, Consulate General of Chile in Chicago, Illinois Lottery, Lopez & Co, Prado & Renteria, Tristan & Cervantes, US Bank

Media Sponsors: CAN-TV, Chicago Latino Network, Chicago Reader, Chicago Sun-Times, Chicago Tribune, La Raza, Mike Oquendo Events, NBC Chicago/Telemundo Chicago, Univision Chicago, WBEZ-FM/Vocalo, WTTW

ADDITIONAL SUPPORT
The Chicago Latino Film Festival receives additional support from: Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events, Chicago Community Trust/Art Works Fund, The Field Foundation of Illinois, The Gaylord & Dorothy Donnelley Foundation, The Illinois Arts Council –a State Agency, The Illinois Bureau of Tourism, the Illinois Film Office, The Joyce Foundation, The National Endowment for the Arts, Nordstrom, The Paul M. Angell Family Foundation, The Reva & David Logan Foundation, and The MacArthur Fund for Culture, Equity, and the Arts at Prince.

ABOUT THE ILCC
The International Latino Cultural Center of Chicago is a pan-Latino, nonprofit, multidisciplinary arts organization dedicated to developing, promoting and increasing awareness of Latino cultures among Latinos and other communities by presenting a wide variety of art forms and education including film, music, dance, visual arts, comedy and theater. The Center prides itself for its outstanding multidisciplinary local and international cultural programming which spans Latin America, Spain, Portugal, and the United States. The International Latino Cultural Center of Chicago also produces other programs, including the year-round Latino Music Series, Film in the Parks, the monthly Reel Film Club, and many others. Audiences have grown from 500 people in 1985 for the first Chicago Latino Film Festival to more than 50,000 (Latinos and non-Latinos) who enjoy the year-round multidisciplinary cross-cultural exchanges offered by the Center.

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